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Thursday Tip of the Day: Prevent Blood Sugar Spikes by Drinking More Water

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Dehydration influences blood sugar control negatively. Over a period of time, it can lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

Water plays a essential role in good health and wellness. Failure to drink sufficient water can lead to spikes in blood sugar. Dehydration- excessive loss of body water can cause the body to induce vasopressin, a naturally occurring hormone that helps control various bodily functions; including helping to prevent loss of water from the body by reducing urine output and helping the kidneys reabsorb water into the body.

A study found that people who drink at least 1 liter (around 34 ounces) of water per day were 21% less likely to develop high blood sugar than those who drank 16 ounces or less per day.

A long-term study on 4,742 people in Sweden originated that over 12.6 years, an increase of vasopressin in the blood was linked to an increase in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

More water, please!

How much water should you drink? Determinately, water consumption is contingent on each individual.

If a doctor doesn’t specify the amount of water intake necessary, a diabetic’s water requirement is the same as of any healthy individual. The Institute of Medicine recommends 3 liters of water for diabetic men and 2.2 liters of water for type 2 diabetic women.

It is important to make sure you drink water as soon as you are parched. Also, intensify water consumption while exercising and during warm weather.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. recommends you choose water preferably over soft drinks and sugary juice considering the sugar content can lead to blood sugar spikes. We also recommend spring water. Although spring water typically undergoes some processing and filtering to remove debris and kill bacteria and other microbes, most of the mineral content such as calcium and magnesium is left in the water.

Cheers!

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a Georgia-based nonprofit organization raising diabetes awareness and prevention through education, community outreach and advocacy programs. We are dedicated and committed to creating supportable and sustainable opportunities for those affected by diabetes.

Written By: Mutima Jackson-Anderson, CHW on September 6, 2018

 

 

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Make a Tax-Deductible Gift by Midnight, December 31

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As we close out 2017, with less than 48 hours left before the arrival of 2018, we invite you to make an impact by supporting our efforts with a year-end contribution.

Gifting an offering to support Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. reinforces our network and helps provide advocacy and community outreach support services for those affected by diabetes. Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. relies on monetary donations, endowments and in-kind benefactions to support, strengthen, and continue our mission.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a GuideStar Exchange Gold Participant, 501c3 nonprofit organization. We manage our funds and donations with at least 90% of contributions going directly to our community programs and services throughout the state of Georgia.

Donations at Work: Millions are living with diabetes. As an charitable organization, we are conscious of the growing needs of those affected by diabetes in the state of Georgia. We are devoted to adapting the foundation to successfully meet the emerging needs of the community and people we serve. We provide comprehensive access to health care and social services to populations at high-risk for developing diabetes, and its complications. Donations at work fund and support free educational workshops, cooking classes and nutrition programs, caregiver training and fitness classes for those disproportionately affected by diabetes in low-income and underserved communities throughout the state of Georgia.

Visit the Programs page on our website to view our specific core programs. Browse through our website, and social media page for a glimpse of our team in action!

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The end of the year is around the corner. Make your tax-deductible gift by midnight, December 31. You still have time. Please do not miss this important deadline.

Donations can be made safe, secure, and fast online here. No matter the amount – big or small – your contribution will make a profound difference in our mission to aid those affected by diabetes.

The mission of Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is to aid those affected by diabetes by raising awareness through education, community outreach and advocacy. We work to subside the diabetes burden by implementing strategies to eradicate health disparities.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a registered public charity under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. All donations are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

On behalf of Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. directors, staff, and dedicated volunteers, I sincerely thank you for your support.

We are looking forward to what 2018 brings!

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

Sincerely,

Mutima K. Jackson-Anderson, President & CEO

Smoothie of the Month: October

October is Flu Season Month! Nourishing Your Immune System…

 

The immune system protects the body from illness, infection, and disease. This complex system uses different body tissues and chemical reactions to defend our bodies from harmful invades like bacteria, viruses, microbes, free radicals, and parasites.
The Components of the Immune System: The Lymphatic system plays a large tole in the immune function. The Lymph Vessel circulate and drain body fluid known as lymph to and from our organs. Lymph transports nutrients to the organs and removes any excess substances from them.

The Lymph also contains white blood cells-the soldiers of our body that kill a wide range of harmful invaders. White blood cells are manufactured in the thymus and one bone marrow, then release into the lymph and circulated through the lymph vessels to their destination.

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Risk Factors for the Immune System:

Diet and lifestyle plays a huge role in our immune system’s ability to keep our body functioning at it best. Unhealthy habits significantly increase the numbers of harmful chemical compounds our body takes in.

  • Processes food
  • Alcohol
  • Cigarette
  • Paint fumes
  • Exhaust fumes and other gasses and pollutants in the air.

Free radicals destabilize healthy atoms in the body, causing cell damage that may eventually lead to illness and disease. Basically, the more free radicals we take in, the harder it becomes for our immune system to keep us healthy.

Immune Statistics:

 

  • The immune system is closely linked to cancer, (source: The second leading death in the US CDC, 2011)
  • Estimated 23.5 Million Americans suffer from autoimmune disease, and incidences are on the rise (source: US Dept. of Health & Human Services 2010)
  • Approximately 1 in 2 males and 1 in 3 females will contract cancer over the course of their lifetime. (source: American Cancer Society,2011)
  • Over 40 diseases have been classified as having autoimmune roots; these diseases can be both chronic and deadly. (source: National Institute of Allergy& Infectious diseases, 2004)

 

Preventing Immune System issues:

  • Living a healthy lifestyle is the KEY to maintaining a powerful immune system.
  • Keep your free radical’s intake low
  • Avoid processed foods
  • Fatty meats
  • Quit smoking
  • Avoid stress (Stress can weaken your immune system)

Foods that boost Your Immune System:

 

  • Carrots, bell peppers, dark leafy greens (high level of Vitamin A)
  • Sunflower seed, almonds (both high in vitamins E- fat soluble that serve as powerful antioxidants.)
  • Papaya, strawberries, citrus, broccoli (high in Vitamin C)
  • Spelt, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, oats (All of these food contain Zinc – an element that maintains white blood cell levels and help heal wounds.)
  • Garlic (known to have antibacterial and antiviral properties, and is also helpful preventing cancers.)

 

 

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The Zinc Booster… We hope you enjoy!

Ingredients 

1 cup Arugula

1 Banana

1 Yellow Pepper

1Cup of Strawberries

¼ cup of pumpkin seeds

1 cup of Spring Water

Ice

Blend it all up, and make a smoothie!

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We suggest you use a NutriBullet, Health Master, Ninja Super Blender! You may also use a regular blender- just blend a a little longer. If you decide to try this recipe, take a photo and tag us on social media! 

Happy Slurping!

Source: Nutribullet Natural Healing Food & William B Ershler” The influence of an aging immune system.”

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a Georgia-based nonprofit organization raising diabetes awareness and prevention through education, community outreach and advocacy programs.

We are dedicated and committed to creating supportable, sustainable opportunities for those affected by diabetes.

For information on services and organization opportunities, please visit www.fightdiabetesnow.org.

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

Artificial Pancreas Filed for Approval in the U.S.

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According to Newsweek, an artificial pancreas that is awaiting approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could help those who suffer from diabetes by monitoring their blood sugar levels. The artificial pancreas would help diabetes sufferers by delivering insulin to prevent hypoglycemic attacks. The MiniMed 640G, which is developed by the Dublin-based firm Medtronic, combines a glucose sensor with an insulin pump that is connected to a patch that delivers insulin into the body. The device works with a display the size of a smartphone that provides information to diabetes sufferers who wear the “artificial pancreas.”

Learn more here.

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

For additional information on Heart Disease, Heart Disease Risk Factors, Preventing Heart Disease and related topics, click here.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a Georgia-based nonprofit organization raising diabetes awareness and prevention through education, community outreach and advocacy programs.

We are dedicated and committed to creating supportable, sustainable opportunities for those affected by diabetes.

For information on services and organization opportunities, please visitwww.fightdiabetesnow.org.

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

 

 

Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

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Did you know? Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure.

It has been estimated that more than 20 million American adults have Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). CKD has two main causes: high blood pressure and diabetes. CKD, especially if undetected, can progress to irreversible kidney failure.

Almost half of people starting dialysis have kidney failure caused by diabetes. Diabetes can damage your kidneys. This damage can happen over many years, without you feeling it. But, even if you have diabetes, you can take steps to help keep your kidneys healthy.

  • Keep Your Kidneys Healthy by Managing Your Diabetes: Managing your diabetes is an important part of keeping your kidneys healthy. If you have diabetes, you can lower your risk for kidney disease by controlling your blood sugar and keeping your blood pressure and cholesterol at the levels set with your provider. Making healthy food choices, being more physically active, and quitting smoking if you smoke also can help keep your kidneys healthy. Losing weight if you are overweight is another way to help your kidneys.
  • Know how well your kidneys are working by getting checked for kidney disease: If you have diabetes, it is important to get checked for kidney disease. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs or symptoms. Testing is the only way to know how your kidneys are doing. Two tests are needed to check for kidney disease. A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering. A urine test checks for albumin in your urine. Albumin is a protein that can pass into the urine when the kidneys are damaged. The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the sooner you can get treatment to help delay or prevent kidney failure. If you have diabetes, talk to your health care provider about getting your kidneys checked.

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Minority populations, particularly African Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans, and American Indians and Alaska Natives, bear a disproportionate burden of CKD and kidney failure.

Your health is important. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, do not forget to speak with your health care provider about kidney disease and kidney disease testing.

Source: The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a Georgia-based nonprofit organization raising diabetes awareness and prevention through education, community outreach and advocacy programs. We are dedicated and committed to creating supportable, sustainable opportunities for those affected by diabetes. For information on services and organization opportunities, please visitwww.fightdiabetesnow.org.

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

February is American Heart Month

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Heart disease is the preeminent cause of death for men and women in the United States. Each year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.
The good news is, oftentimes, heart disease can be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage health conditions.
In collaboration with our community partners, we endeavor to make a difference in communities by spreading awareness and strategies for preventing heart disease. We encourage you to live heart healthy lives.
In awareness of American Heart Month, we hope you can benefit from a few tips to help you control your risk of heart disease.

Reduce Blood Sugar

Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Your body makes a hormone called insulin that acts like a carrier to take your food energy into your cells. If your fasting blood sugar level is below 100, you are in the healthy range. If not, your results could indicate diabetes or pre-diabetes.
The following tips can all help reduce your blood sugar:

  • Reduce consumption of simple sugars that are found in soda, candy and sugary desserts
  • Get regular physical activity! Moderate intensity aerobic physical activity directly helps your body respond to insulin
  • Take medications or insulin if it is prescribed for you

Manage Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.

To help manage blood pressure:

  • Follow the healthy plate (1/2 plate vegetables, 1/4 protein, 1/4 starch)
  • Avoid processed foods which can be high in salt (sodium)
  • Be physically active daily (30-60 minutes)
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Manage stress, limit alcohol and avoid tobacco smoke.

Control Cholesterol

When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages. Cholesterol combines with white blood cells and forms plaque in your veins and arteries. This plaque forms blockages which lead to heart disease and stroke.

Eat Healthy Foods

Healthy foods are the fuel our bodies use to make new cells and create the energy we need to thrive and fight diseases.  Let Food be Your Medicine. A few tips for healthy eating:

  • Eat vegetables and fruits daily (Make ½ your plate consist of vegetables)
  • Eat fiber-rich foods including beans and oatmeal
  • Eat fish twice a week
  • Use healthy oils including extra virgin olive and coconut oil
  • Avoid processed and refined foods
  • Avoid added sugars

Get Fit! Be Active

If you get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity (like brisk walking), five days a week, you can almost guarantee yourself a healthier and more satisfying life while lowering your risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Go Smoke FREE! Stop Smoking

Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Do you know the risk of Smoking and Diabetes? Are you aware that secondhand smoke has been linked to Type 2 diabetes and obesity? Smoking and secondhand smoke can contribute to very serious, life-threatening health complications for people with diabetes- or at a high risk of developing diabetes. People with diabetes who smoke have higher levels of HbA1c than nonsmoking people with diabetes. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.  Smoking can also reduce your good cholesterol (HDL) and your lung capacity, making it harder to get the physical activity you need for better health. Whatever it takes for you to stop smoking, it is worth it!

Lose Weight

If you have too much fat — especially if you carry it all in your waist — you’re at higher risk for such health problems as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and diabetes. Even losing as few as five or ten pounds can produce a dramatic blood pressure reduction.

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.

For additional information on Heart Disease, Heart Disease Risk Factors, Preventing Heart Disease and related topics, click here.

Ruby A. Neeson Diabetes Awareness Foundation, Inc. is a Georgia-based nonprofit organization raising diabetes awareness and prevention through education, community outreach and advocacy programs.

We are dedicated and committed to creating supportable, sustainable opportunities for those affected by diabetes.

For information on services and organization opportunities, please visit www.fightdiabetesnow.org.

Fight Diabetes Now- Together We Can Win!

Healthy Heart Recipe: Strawberry and Pineapple Parfait

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Heart Healthy, and Diabetic Friendly Treat Just for You!

Many diabetics shy away from fruit because they perceive it to be high in sugar and therefore likely to raise their blood-glucose levels. However, the American Diabetes Association encourages diabetics to include fruit as part of their diets because fruits, including strawberries, contain essential vitamins and minerals for good health.

Pineapples are both juicy and fleshy with the stem serving as the fibrous core. They are generally harvested during the autumn season, with availability year round fresh. Pineapples are not only delicious to many, they contain several nutritional benefits such as: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C.

Strawberries can be part of a balanced diabetic diet, and they may even provide specific health benefits for diabetics. According to research reported in the April 2010 issue of “The British Journal of Nutrition,” consuming strawberries and other berries may reduce the body’s overall glucose response after a meal.

You can regulate your blood sugar level by adding coconut fiber to your diet. Coconut fiber is in the meat of the coconut.

This raw parfait recipe is super simple and easy. All you’ll need is:

2 cups of young coconut meat
4 cup of chunky pieces of fresh pineapple
4 cups of sliced strawberries (you really only need 1 cup of sliced strawberries, the rest will get blended)

Blend 1 cup of young coconut meat with 3 cups of pineapple (using a Vitamix is ideal for that creamy consistency but a regular food processor works as well) and place at the bottom of your glass. Sprinkle with pineapple chunks on top.

Blend the other cup of young coconut meat with 3 cups of strawberries and place on top of the layered pineapple cream and pineapple chunks.

For the finish, top it off with the remaining cup of sliced strawberries.

Enjoy!

A healthy lifestyle is pivotal to living well with diabetes. Nourishment, and a healthy balanced diet plays a important part in that process.

Recipe Courtesy of Healthy Heart Coalition of Fulton County

*Disclaimer:

If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider.